Blog

bannercheetahtracking

English Afrikaans Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French German Italian Japanese Portuguese Russian Spanish
Dec06

Reality Check

WRITTEN BY // Claudia Hauter CATEGORIES // Rhinoprotect-blog

RESCUING THE RHINO

Reality Check

As the year winds to a close, we look back on devastating statistics in rhino poaching. In 2010, 333 rhinos were killed in South Africa alone. In 2012 that number has almost doubled – currently standing at 588. Propelled by mythic beliefs pertaining to the value of the rhino horn's use, there has been an increase in the demand for the horn – particularly in certain Asian countries – and hence in poaching. Dispelling ancient beliefs and myths can take eons and, with rapidly declining numbers, time is not something the rhino has on its side.

We have heard all this before and, quite frankly, it is starting to become nothing more than preaching to the converted. We know there is an increased demand. We know the practice of rhino poaching has worsened. We know the rhino teeters on the brink of extinction. Poachers know this too. The problem is they don't care. It is important to realise that there is no final answer or solution. Poachers know what everyone else does and it does not deter them. Although ignorance may fuel the demand, it does not fuel the trade. It is a trade fostered by greed and indifference – virtually impenetrable barriers.

It may be a trifle ironic to state this in a written post, but at times actions truly do speak louder than words. For too long the struggle has been passive. The tide is slowly turning and more active measures are being sought and taken. Many private reserves have resorted to dehorning their rhinos. Others have gone so far as to suggest the legalisation of rhino horn trading. Inverdoorn has taken steps to protect their rhino by injecting them with a new treatment which poisons the horn, without affecting the animal.

The next step is further involvement. During the 1980s the demand for ivory caused a boom in elephant poaching and a major decline in the population of both African and Asian elephants. The problem, although not stopped altogether, was eventually assuaged due to a ban on international ivory sales in 1990. An international ban has been in place on rhino poaching since 1980, but measures need to be sought closer to home as well. After a vicious spate of rhino killings in the North West recently, Premier Thandi Modise considered requesting the assistance of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) in the struggle to protect the rhino. Serious commitment and support from top – and local – government officials will go a long way, along with a willingness to acknowledge and address the issue.

Although the time for action has certainly arrived it does not mean anything else that has been done up until now must come to a grinding halt. A few years ago, rhino poaching was not the hot topic of discussion it is today. There were no concerts for rhinos, no races for rhinos, no rhino days and no red rhinoses. Social awareness and endeavour have brought the rhino's plight to the fore. Poaching and trade will continue regardless; but if those against it plough onwards with the same determination then perhaps an answer lies in perseverance.

 

inverdoorn-divider

 

About the author

Claudia Hauter

Claudia Hauter

Taught from a young age to save the planet and driven by a love of the environment, Claudia Hauter now writes and manages social media for Inverdoorn Game Reserve, Western Cape Cheetah Conservation and RhinoProtect – hoping to do her part in saving this little planet we call home.

Comments (0)

Leave a comment

You are commenting as guest. Optional login below.

Reservations & Info

Inverdoorn Game Reserve

 

PO BOX 304 SEA POINT 8060
CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA

Tel:  +27 (0)214 344 639
Fax: +27 (0)214 331 157

Mail: info@inverdoorn.com

Meet The Team

  • Meet the Team: Martial Viot

    Meet the Team: Martial Viot

    The staff at Inverdoorn hail from various parts of South Africa, and even other parts of the world. As a result they all have very different and diverse backgrounds, but are connected by...

  • An American in South Africa

    An American in South Africa

    My name is John McIlvaine and I am from Seattle, Washington, USA. This is my second trip to South Africa to do volunteer cheetah conservation work, but this is my first time at...

  • Meet the Team: Lana Simon

    Meet the Team: Lana Simon

    The staff at Inverdoorn hail from various parts of South Africa, and even other parts of the world. As a result they all have very different and diverse backgrounds, but are connected by...

  • Meeting the Volunteers: Kirsty Woodhead

    Meeting the Volunteers: Kirsty Woodhead

    Before meeting Kirsty Woodhead, I knew that she had South African roots and was curious to hear her accent. Having moved to Canada at a young age, she has lost her accent and laments this...

Keep up to Date

For all the latest news about your favourite animals at Inverdoorn like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for the latest news and blog posts about the cheetahs, the rhinos, the lions and all the other animals that live on the reserve. Read about the people who look after them and have dedicated their lives to wildlife and its conservation.

Share Your View

Did you enjoy your trip to Inverdoorn? Submit a review to Trip Advisor or send us a review via our website. We want to hear all about your trip: what you liked, what you saw, the best parts and any suggestions and ideas for how we can improve the experience for YOU are also welcome. You can read what others have said about us by checking out some of the articles and press releases or chat to other guests on Trip Advisor. You can even join our Inverdoorn Community and stay in touch with our rangers, animal handlers and other guests.

Contact Infos

Inverdoorn Game Reserve

PO BOX 304 SEA POINT 8060
CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA

Tel:  +27 (0)214 344 639
Fax: +27 (0)214 331 157

Mail: info@inverdoorn.com

footer map inverdoorn